Amateur Videos – Essentials

We are living in a digital world, where pretty much everything gets uploaded online. There are 80 million web hosts according to the stats made in 2006. The growth of the World Wide Web is obvious, it’s all on the web – companies addresses, documents, pictures, books, you can buy everything from cars to ships. But it’s not just documents any more, pages are far from stating these days. The web is now full with video clips being shared by millions of people around the world. Amateur Videos

Google Video allows people to search for video files, download and play them on their computers. Although Google has not released an exact number of the video files available at their site, they claim there are several thousands and increasing all the time. The video material includes just about anything – TV shows, movies, amateur videos, commercials not displayed on US channels, etc. The files are either free of charge or must be purchase online from the Google Video Store. Google Video enables users from all over the world to upload their own content on Google Servers and share it with everyone. The files are in GVI, AVI, GVP and MP4 formats.

Google Video Player lets you watch videos that have been downloaded or purchased from the Google Video website, video.google.com. Google Video Player allows you to watch the videos in full screen as well as browse the video using thumbnails. It also uses OpenSSL Toolkit, QPluginLoader and QLibrary classes.

Some say that Google Video is just an effort of the search engine giant to enter the online video sharing, gathering up a rich archive of moving pictures to be accessed either for free or for pay. Market trick or not, Google Video is here to stay and this article will try to familiarize you with the technology behind it.

The Google Video Player is a piece of software that transfers the paid video content from Google’s servers to your computer. There is a version for MAC and Windows. Technically as a video player, it has some pretty cool features. It allows you to browse the scenes using thumbnails, so that one can easily find each and every moment.

The GV player has full-screen mode and the FTP portion of it is on a high level as it supports download resuming, automatically. This is a really nice feature especially for people on a dial-up or other users with a low and unstable connection. Perhaps the only strange thing about this application is that it is made to play paid-content, which is sort of useless, considering the amount of websites with video clips and all the video players, torrents and ftp clients.

The overall success of this software depends on the richness of the library. If it has a lot of interesting content, it will succeed even if the service is paid. But if the library is weak, then it doesn’t matter how smart and functional the player is, cause it just won’t matter when you don’t have any multimedia to play.

In the context of all that, it’s important to know that Google faces a strong competition when it comes to online video content, from the likes of YouTube, MetaCage, iFilm and several other websites with a pretty decent traffic. A lot of money are involved in this sector, so that’s a big opportunity for any company. The content available at Google Video is mostly amateur, because of the ease with which users can upload their files. Video files can be uploaded at the website video.google.com or with the help of Google Video Uploader, available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.

But it’s not just amateurs that upload content to Google Video, television networks also participate by making whole shows available and Hollywood studios are also putting up some movie trailers. Because of all that, the video quality is inconsistent, depending on who uploaded it. There are all types of video files, copy-protected or not, with or without ads. Google screens out any sex related material, so Google Video is totally safe for the children.